Notify Message
Forums
#11001345 May 01, 2015 at 05:12 PM
15 Posts
I'm really looking forward to writing my first peer assessed assignment and wondered if it was ok to ask people here (having much more experience than me!) what their thoughts were on the social dimension to LOTRO. In your opinion, is it something separate to playing the game or does it become an integral part thereof? I'm also wondering to what extent the social side of LOTRO determines / influences the narrative / fiction created and also whether those of you who are long-term players would have continued to play the game as long without the social dimension? Apologies if these are really obviously "newbie" questions and hope it's ok to ask for people's thoughts to inform my first assessment! Thanks!
+0 Quote
#11001441 May 01, 2015 at 05:43 PM
19 Posts
#11001345 Lorabess wrote:

Apologies if these are really obviously "newbie" questions and hope it's ok to ask for people's thoughts to inform my first assessment! Thanks!

Your questions are interesting and also "newbies" may spot issues the old-timers are not aware of.

#11001345 Lorabess wrote:

what their thoughts were on the social dimension to LOTRO. In your opinion, is it something separate to playing the game or does it become an integral part thereof?

This is different from player to player. Some clearly separate role play from adventuring. Some tend to always adventure in groups, that's a social dimension I think. Many (me included) try to be always in character (*), i.e. to be in character if at all practical.

#11001345 Lorabess wrote:

I'm also wondering to what extent the social side of LOTRO determines / influences the narrative / fiction created

If the "narrative/fiction created" means a character's history, much of it comes from interacting with others.

#11001345 Lorabess wrote:

whether those of you who are long-term players would have continued to play the game as long without the social dimension?

In my case: No.

Hope this is enough to start the ball rolling, I got more to say but must first sleep on this.

(*) So I guess in this context I am equating the social dimension with role play, which is at least 90% true for me.
+1 Quote
#11003351 May 02, 2015 at 09:30 AM
Course Tutor...
85 Posts
I like the social aspects very much and worry about not speaking to people if I haven't been playing for a while. My virtual friends are important to me and I wouldn't continue to play but for them.

I don't role play a lot. I thought I would but I have tried several times and I just can't get the hang of it. I am much more interested in people's real lives than their fictional ones. But a lot of people do a lot of role play. I think they must have more imagination that I do. I am quite disappointed that I can't do it as it was a primary reason for joining this server.
+0 Quote
#11004238 May 02, 2015 at 01:57 PM
Kinship Leader
143 Posts
To me, the social aspects of LOTRO are very important. I have played a few games over the last decades, also some MMOs but none had such a rich social aspect than LOTRO.
What adds to this experience is the marvellous community and the music system, as well as the fact that the game is based on great books.

+0 Quote
#11005246 May 02, 2015 at 06:56 PM
58 Posts
Ah RP-ing......

I really have a love-hate-relation with it.
I like the game a lot and I really loooooove the fact that there are social events.
I enjoy seeing people getting into character, but that is something that I really cannot do.
After 5 minutes of trying to participate all I wanna do is shout very loudly IT'S JUST A GAME and GET A LIFE and stuff like that.
RP-ing just gets on my nerves if it's taken too far.

But there is a cure for that: simply walk away from it............
For me it's very nice that there is the option to RP, but also the option to not do it

We had a lot of fun at the welcoming party by visiting a RP-event: the normal chat and the Coursera-chat were really fun to see next to each other.

in short: just do what you want, it's a great game/ life!

Aza
******** MUSIC MADE THIS WORLD! ********
+1 Quote
#11025288 May 07, 2015 at 07:06 PM
15 Posts
Thank you all - super helpful :-)
+0 Quote
#11029999 May 09, 2015 at 02:41 AM
19 Posts
It's strange to me that so many people are quiet in the Coursera channel (which plays the role of Kin channel for us). One of the first thing I do when I log on is check if there are others in the channel and if so, greet them. Often there is no response, even if I can see there are a handful of people about.

I do not say this to complain or berate people, everyone has the right to remain silent. Perhaps some are shy, or are busy and have no time to type, or feel they have nothing to say, or have no interest in talking to me, which is all fine wiith me. Why I bring it up is to illustrate the importance of the social dimension to players like me, for the friendships which may evolve (even if they are virtual), for the community we may create and for cooperative play (which I much prefer to competitive games).

Also we in the channel are here for a (self-proclaimed) University level course. Ought there not be debate in our channel?

As an aside, perhaps the topic of role-playing is of enough interest to split it off into a separate thread?
+0 Quote
#11032420 May 09, 2015 at 07:22 PM
15 Posts
I try to say hi if I'm there and see that others are, or to respond if someone says hi to the group in general or to me. Sometimes, if I'm playing, I don't notice what happens on the Chat because I'm still new and focussed on what I'm doing but one of the things I'm hoping to gain from the course is new friendships so I'm hoping that over the coming weeks, I will be able to have more conversations with people. Also, it would be great to engage in some debate on the Chat channel too! Thanks.
+0 Quote
#11033199 May 10, 2015 at 01:45 AM
19 Posts
#11032420 Lorabess wrote:

Sometimes, if I'm playing, I don't notice what happens on the Chat

It's indeed easy to miss something in chat. Go here (another thread in this forum) to see an example of how to manage chat.
+0 Quote